Tag Archives: Wright State University

I’ve been an absentee blogger…

When I started writing this blog my intention was to write once a week and post on Monday. Now, I have to confess that I have not done so well with that, and any of you who read me already know this.  While I enjoy writing very much, when I am really consumed with art making the writing takes a back seat, and my writing pen has been languishing there since the second of February. Oops. Can’t keep to a schedule? Sometimes, I can’t. It’s not possible to do it all, all the time.

Since February’s posting I have hung a new exhibit of my work in the office of the Dayton mayor, participated in an evening of art in Centerville, hosted an art party, submitted several proposals, completed one very large tapestry collage and several other collages, tweaked my new studio, given a workshop, delighted in the newly revised Montgomery County Business of Art website (more about that in a later post), and begun the planning of an art trip to Belgium and the Netherlands, all this while continuing my usual teaching and studio work schedule. Odd, all of a sudden I am feeling slightly breathless….!

It’s been a satisfying and productive last two months. I have made new art and met new friends. I have been lucky to spend time with old friends. Life has been good.

I am planning now for the summer and fall, and scheduling work on several series of collages, in addition to working on some other new non-collage possibilities. I have lots of ideas; more ideas than hours in the day!

I also don’t like to write posts that are too long, so I am going to close now with some pictures. Keep it creative! 

Here is a (not great) photo I shot of one of my new tapestry collages from the Paper Lives series. This is the second one I have done and plans are under way for number three. The title is Sea Change.
My grand puppies, Olive on the left, Guyute on the right. They are good buddies. 

The art in smart

Just a thought for today: Supporters of art are movers and shakers, which is why ART is the foundation of SMART!

Some New Year’s Thoughts 2011

Art is life-giving.

It’s an intangible. How can you explain to someone who has never experienced the power of an original piece of work, something that has sprung from the thought of one human being, brought into existence due to that person’s trials and errors, sweat, mental anguish, trying to get it right, to make physical that which he or she sees in the mind’s eye? Art adds life – to the walls of your home, your cubicle at work, your city parks, the very roadways you travel – breath and thought and feeling and connection, a communication offered from the artist to you.

It was a difficult year, 2010. Many of us felt the negatives of an economy sliding downhill, jobs moving in not equal to the companies moving out, the broad sweep of cuts to the arts because funds are stretched to the nth degree just to cover the most basic of services. Hard decisions have had to be made. We all want to live in a community with plenty of recreational opportunities and cultural offerings. Most of us realize that in our current world we must get creative to provide those amenities when our cities are pushing to fill empty buildings, entice new enterprise, appeal to and keep our young adult residents.

This is why we need the life sustaining power of art more than ever, and it is also why it is time for those of us who live and breathe and work in the arts to do more – I know, I know, we all are always being asked to do more – but small things can truly add up to big accomplishments. There is strength in numbers, and while competition is healthy, there really is great power in collaboration.

Dayton, Ohio, where I live and work,  is remarkable in its offerings in the arts; it has more than most cities its size (a provable statistic by the way). We have more talented professional artists than most, we have fine galleries that could use more traffic and support, and we have an art institute that rivals those of many larger metropolitan areas. Dayton has been blessed by the philanthropy of past citizens who loved this city and its people; we are still enjoying the fruits of that generosity today. Moreover, we are charged with living up to that legacy. We need to, now more than ever before.

Saturday Morning Post

Working on some new pieces, one using no color at all, just variations on black and white. Have started two new pieces in the House series as well. I spent yesterday putting together an installation that will go to Gorman School in Dayton. I have been working on it over the summer, assembling the components which are made from recycled materials. So far I have created a very colorful “pole” forest with some wind and sound components to accompany the forest. I hope to start installing this week!

I have a busy fall ahead; classes start soon and I will be filling the heads of college students with lots of world art history. I have been tweaking my course to add in some things I felt were needed for a full first exposure to art (most of the students I teach have had little experience with art; I like opening their minds).

In addition there are several shows coming  up in the very near future, lots of happenings at my main gallery The Cannery Art and Design Center, as well as at Really Cool Stuff where I sell my cards and small art items. The Holiday Gift Gallery is gearing up at the Dayton Visual Arts Center soon as well. Best yet, we will be bopping over to DC to see our son, who graduated from Georgetown last May and is working in the capital city. We – my family – have all lived in the DC area  and it is a favorite place for us. A friend told me last week that Mark Rothko’s chapel paintings are on view, so I have to see them. Best part of course, will be spending time with my son! I miss the guy!

Best of Intentions

Well, I have finished grading all my students’ work and turned in the grades (I teach art history at Wright State University in Dayton and love it!). Now I can really focus on the studio. It’s always a juggling act between teaching and creating. I suppose I could not teach, but I love sharing the history and interacting with my students. I love when they return from the “dreaded” museum visit and tell me with surprise that they had a great time! As a teacher I am developing new art appreciators and patrons, and without them we can sell no art!

I had wonderful classes this year filled with interesting and engaged students. Every time I teach I learn something new and I think this knowledge informs my own art. It also makes me appreciate my place within the continuum of artists and history, and I think that’s a good thing.

I promise, that new art will be posted soon!